Infendo back online! Collective Nintendo fans breathe sigh of relief

Infendo

sigh of relief

MUSHROOM KINGDOM—After an intense couple of hours Friday morning, the internet’s #1 Nintendo fan site became fully operational, after a glitch caused all site links to fail for an unidentified period of time. “Infendo world headquarters were a mess today,” said a visibly frustrated David Cole, managing editor of the site. “I had to email Blake [the publisher] like 10 times before he was able to upgrade our database and conquer the technical difficulties.”

At approximately 7 am EDT, Infendo dispatch had already received over one million calls from concerned readers, says Cole. “They were like, ‘Dudes, your site isn’t working,” he recounted. One reader even verbally threatened contributors Jack and Derek with the mother of all internet threats, saying “This is the last time I’m coming to this site!”

Because his children uncharacteristically slept in this morning (who double as his alarm clock), Blake was unable to fully remedy the problem until precisely 11:42 EDT. “Fortunately the fix was sweeping,” he says.

When asked for comment, a representative from the Official Infendo Fan Club said, “A lot of fans struggled with the malfunction—some were in tears even.” A source close to a collegue who saw Will’s girlfriend at 31 Flavors last night said there was a “groundswell of support” to rally the site back to health. A cry to “Save Infendo” was even painted onto some unidentified water tower in Chicago, one reader said. “These fans move quickly because there’s never anything to play on their dusty Wiis,” a spokesperson said.

“In any case, it will never happen again,” he assured. “And if it does, at least we outsold GoNintendo by 2 to 1 last month in NPD numbers, and our attach rate is way better than Kotaku.”

Known for its dull, infrequent, and defensive commentary—not to mention its inability to admit that Nintendo screwed the pooch this generation—Infendo will celebrate its fifth anniversary next year on the road to a 10-year product life cycle.